A Celiac in the House

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As I sit across from you, why wouldn’t you think that I don’t take my celiac disease seriously?

At no point should the people in your home question the reasons you are gluten-free if you have celiac disease. The ones who reside with you (it can be anyone. Not just partners, but children and sisters and brothers and mothers and sisters) are the ones closest to you and need to know how serious celiac disease is.

The choices diagnosed celiacs make in their home is based on the very simple reason that they need to be healthy. This includes everything from separating the gluten-free food from the regular food or scooping separate jar of peanut butter for later consumption (to avoid cross contamination). Every step taken by a diagnosed celiac has a premeditated plan: STAY HEALTHY.

Aside from having to eat 100% gluten-free, diagnosed celiacs are just regular people. When I say choices made, I don’t mean going out and smoking a whole lot of crack, I mean making sure that the canned kidney beans made in the communal chilli is gluten-free or that regular bread-type crouton aren’t in the teaser salad at the table. The life of a celiac in the home can be great and it can be bad.

There are no rules in the home to follow for celiacs. Some homes are 100% gluten-free and some are shared food homes. It all depends on how you feel. No two celiacs deal with heir disease the same. And thats ok. There is no definite book or rule to live by when you have celiac disease.

Cross contamination happens. Sometimes when the table is filled with various types of food, it happens. That’s why it is extremely important to know what is happening at the table and what is happening with the other plates:

  1. Did the serving spoon touch that guy’s bun?
  2. Did a crumb from that slice of bread fall into the mashed potatoes as they handed it across the table?

Sure, having a 100% gluten-free home could eliminate questions and potential problems like this, but sometimes you can’t always have it that way.

That’s why is important for all the people in your home to understand the severity of cross contamination and what celiac disease is. Shuffling off the crumb in the broccoli as ‘maybe something else’ isn’t the answer. If a diagnosed celiac suspects that that ‘something else’ is in fact a crumb of bread from someone else at the table, believe them. When it comes down to it; it’s not about the food getting eaten or making sure all the food at the table is eaten, its about the health of the celiac.

Cross contamination is real and thats why there is AND should be a huge emphasis on it in shared food households. Everyone in the house has to be on board with what a celiac is putting down. If the others in your home choose to be ignorant to this fact, then there is an issue. Is it trust? Is it neglect? These are questions that you have to ask yourself when your VERY SERIOUS disease is shuffled off at the dinner table. Shuffled off by the people who are supposed to care for you.

Yes a crumb will hurt me. No I won’t just eat around it.

I have celiac disease, understand that this is my life and you have to get on board with it’s severity. Being 100% gluten-free isn’t a fad to me, it’s what i need to actually survive, to be healthy and to ultimately be happy.

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